Tag Archives: Writing

Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott

Paperback: 272 pages
Publisher: Anchor
Price: $16.00
Purchase: Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description

“Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write. It was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother’s shoulder, and said, ‘Bird by bird, buddy.  Just take it bird by bird.'”

Review

What I got out of Bird by Bird is the love and respect for the craft. Writers shouldn’t get into writing because they want to be the next John Grisham or Jackie Collins, or to make thousands of dollars, or to see their name up in lights. Writers don’t write for fame, fortune or accolades. They write because they love the art and respect the craft.

This was the first book I’ve read by Anne Lamott, and I enjoyed her voice and writing style. She writes from the heart and in truth about the craft and her life. She doesn’t avoid difficult topics, and tackles them with humor.

She doesn’t sell you pipe dreams or pie in the sky fantasies about writing. She encourages you to write, and not stop, even if your work never gets published.

This excerpt spoke volumes to me:

“Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose or their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on the boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.”

All in all, Bird by Bird is a wonderful book which I will read again. This is a book you will want to keep in your library. If you write or want to write, I highly recommend this book.

Anne Lamott is the New York Times bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow; Small Victories; Stitches; Some Assembly Required; Grace (Eventually); Plan B; Traveling Mercies; Bird by Bird; Operating Instructions, and the forthcoming Hallelujah Anyway. She is also the author of several novels, including Imperfect Birds and Rosie. A past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and an inductee to the California Hall of Fame, she lives in Northern California.

 

 

 

 

 

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Author Interview: Seth Ferranti

After reading a book by Ethan Brown called, Queens Reigns Supreme, which I personally didn’t care for.

I discovered Seth Ferranti’s book,  The Supreme Team, and found his book amazing.

If you want to know a true account of The Supreme Team, this is the book to read.

Mr. Ferranti’s writing voice is vibrant, bold, and raw. When you read his work, you know it’s the real deal.

I have been following Mr. Ferranti’s work ever since and it is with great pleasure to introduce him to you today.

 

1) So tell us a little bit about yourself? Where did you grow up? What was your childhood like?

I grew up in California, born and raised. My father was in the military, so basically, I am a military brat. We moved around a lot. I lived in Germany, England, and on the East Coast too, but we always moved back to California.

I was an outgoing and head strong child who was probably a little rebellious. Fancied myself a rebel without a cause. But my childhood was good.

2) When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

I started out writing songs, music and poetry when I was 12 or 13. But before that I was playing “Dungeons and Dragons and creating worlds to play that game in.

I have always been creative. I was into poetry, music, writing articles, then chapters, and then books. For me, it was a natural progression. Hopefully movies are next.

3) When did you decide you wanted to write a book?

I started doing this short story idea which became my first book, Prison Stories. So probably around the late 90’s, I decided I wanted to become a writer and start penning books. But it wasn’t like I just did it, it was a long and slow process. At first, it took several years, but now I can crank them out in six months.

4) How did the idea or inspiration come?

I just saw what other people were doing and I liked reading the books on prison life and true crime. Like the Mafia and Cartel books. I decided I wanted to do something representative of the time I was doing in the Feds. I wanted to write about the inner city gangsters that the rappers were talking about, so I did.

5) What are some of your all-time favorite books?

I love In the Belly of the Beast by Jack Henry Abbot, Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, 1984 by George Orwell, On the Road by Jack Kerouac, Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter Thompson, Soledad Brother by George Jackson.

6) What was the hardest book to write and why?

The Supreme Team was a monumental effort. I got a lot of resistance from some of the dudes involved, so that was satisfying to finally get out. It is a monster of a book and I really think it needed to be published to give their history. They influenced hip-hop and the streets so much. But it was a big deal to get all the clearances for that book and I had several delays before I was finally able to put it out.

7) Which was your favorite book to write?

Every project I do is dear to my heart, but I like the Prison Stories book. Because it was my first and it was a journey I had never been on before.

8) How did you develop the confidence to approach magazines with your work?

I am very outgoing and I do what I call, jumping out there. I just expose myself. You get a lot of rejection and if you can’t take it, no sense in doing it. But I don’t have a problem with rejection. I believe in myself and maybe someone doesn’t feel me, my work or my vibe, but if I keep jumping out there, someone probably will.

9) Where have you published your articles?

You can go on the publications section of gorillaconvict.com and check out a lot of my published works from magazines and the Internet or just Google my name and a lot of stuff comes up. I am in the process of updating the site right now, so more recent stuff will be going up.

10) You were just released from prison a few weeks ago? For those of us who don’t know, what is it like being in prison? How did you manage to overcome the many obstacles presented to you? How long were you in prison for? Was there any retaliation for writing in prison and why? Do you have any ideas on how we can reform the justice and prison system? What are some of your thoughts on this?

Prison sucks for real. You just have to stay busy and stay out of the drama and keep your head down. It’s great to be out. I just did the time, I didn’t let it do me. I didn’t get involved in the mix and the prison politics. I didn’t let the system eat me up. I stayed busy with school, my writing and working out. That’s the key.

I was in prison for 21 years. I was put in the hole numerous times for my writing. The prison officials don’t like when you expose what is going on in there. And especially when you have a national audience like I did.

They need to stop giving out so much time, it’s absurd. I did 21 years for a first time nonviolent offense.

Reform the whole system. It’s a bloated corrupt system right now.

Investigate it. Stop turning a blind eye. People only care when it happens to them.

11) What are some of the valuable lessons you’ve learned from doing time?

Time is precious. I feel so behind now, like I have to accomplish all my life’s goals in the next 5-10 years. I just feel like I am way behind and that I have to catch up.

But doing time teaches you to be patient and that everything unpleasant is only temporary.

12) If you could have done something different what would it have been?

I wish I would have had a clue when I was 19 and that I wouldn’t have sold drugs, but that is now. When I was twenty, no one could have told me anything.

13) What kept you going and what got you through the hard days?

I saw the light at the end of the tunnel. I was living through my writing. I was accomplishing things. I set goals and I realized them. I earned college degrees, I wrote articles and books. I had a life outside of prison.

14) What are things you value and appreciate now that most people take for granted?

I just enjoy taking a walk with my wife and my dog. Choosing my own food to eat. Buying my own clothes. Walking around the mall. Going on the computer. These things a worthwhile to me.

15) How has your perspective on life changed?

I am grown and mature. I know life isn’t fair and that I don’t know everything. I know life can change in an instant and it can all be taken away.

16) What advice would you give the youth of today?

Time is precious, don’t waste it.

17) Will you be writing a memoir?

Yes. I am going to New York in the new year, when I get out of the halfway house, to find an agent who can represent my various endeavors.

18) Lastly, what advice would you give to writers who are just starting out?

I always tell people to just write. Just write and write and write and edit and edit and edit. You have to build up your catalog and content. You have to have pieces you are always working on and crafting and bringing to perfection. You can’t be a writer if you don’t write and you have to jump out there. Who will know about you if you don’t jump out there.

Thank you so much, Mr. Ferranti. It was a pleasure having you as my guest. I wish you a multitude of success, in your life, and future endeavors.

My name is Seth Ferranti. I am the gorilla convict writer. I completed my Masters degree in Humanities through California State University. Previously, I earned an AA degree in Letters, Arts and Sciences from Penn State University and a BA degree in Liberal Arts from the University of Iowa. I have written several hundred articles, including feature stories, for magazines such as Don Diva, Feds, King, FHM, Slam, Street Elements, Vice and websites like hoopshype.com, viceland.com and urbanbooksource.com, among others. I have contributed short stories and pieces to Nikki Turner Presents Christmas in the Hood, Out of the Gutter Vol. 1 to 5, Badlands Publishing’s Money Power and Betrayal short story collection and Prison Chronicles published by Gutter Books. My blog on gorillaconvict.com gives the 411 on prison, street legends, the mafia, prison gangs, urban authors and life in the belly of the beast. It attracts 15 to 20k unique visitors and over 250,000 hits a month.  For my next projects I am interested in writing a book on the notorious prison gang, the Aryan Brotherhood and a memoir on my case which led to my eventual incarceration. I have written two screenplays, THE DOPE SHOW, about gangs battling over the heroin trade in prison and THE SUPREME TEAM, which chronicles Prince’s rise and fall in the drug game during the crack era in late 1980’s Jamaica, Queens. You can find me on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

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My Writing Journey

I apologize for not blogging in awhile. One day runs into the next and before you know it, a month has passed.

I need to get better about blogging at least once a week. I have been writing a lot, just not blogging.

I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned I’m working on a novel.

Courtesy of Creative Commons

It all began last October when I decided to participate in NanoWriMo without ever writing a piece of fiction in my life. I know it sounds crazy. It was hard, but I felt the most alive.

I am glad I pushed through the fear and took the dive, because I’ve discovered I enjoy writing fiction.

Thus, my focus has been more on my novel and less on blogging.

I began this blog a couple of years ago with the focus on book reviews. I still enjoy writing book reviews, however, recently my reading has been exclusive to research.

I’m learning a great deal about the discipline and art of fiction writing. It’s been an interesting journey to say the least.

I just wanted to take the time to update you, since I didn’t want any of you to think I fell off the map.

There has been so much on my heart I’ve wanted to share. But each time I tried, I would choke up and not write anything at all.

For me, good writing is like eating a gourmet meal and not fast food. I want to be able to write something of substance and quality; and not regurgitate the same ole, same ole.

I want to thank all of you for hanging in there with me as I find my way on this writing journey.

Do you struggle to write when your heart and mind are full? What do you do to push past it?

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Author Interview: Andi Cumbo-Floyd

I first met Andi Cumbo-Floyd on line almost two years ago. I believe it might have been on Twitter. I started following her blog and eventually took her essay class, which is fantastic.

Andi is a dear, kind, generous, gifted writer and teacher. I have learned so much from her over the past couple of years.

She demonstrates incredible patience when I come at her with a million questions. She handles everything with grace and professionalism.

I am happy she agreed to do this interview with me. I hope you enjoy it.

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1) When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

You know, it wasn’t until graduate school that I really wanted to be “a writer” per se. Ted Gup, one of my professors, told me that  I might want to think about getting an MFA instead of the PhD in literature that I was planning on. That was the first moment that I thought about how much I liked to write. I had always wanted to be a reader – you know, someone people would pay to read books – but a writer – someone who produced those books – that was a new idea to me.

2) Who have been your influences?

What a good question – so first, my parents. They were profoundly generous people, and they taught me always to be kind, even when people weren’t kind to me.  They were also big readers, so I got that true from them. My mom could read three or four books in a week, and my dad probably averages about 2 himself.

In terms of writing, I would say Madeleine L’Engle and C.S. Lewis were the first writers who pulled me into new worlds. I still love them.

Also, Tracy Kidder, Toni Morrison, Sherman Alexie, Chaim Potok, Lia Purpura . . . I could go on forever.

3) What books help shape you as a writer?

Well, A Wrinkle in Time by L’Engle and The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis taught me that words have real power – the power to heal and comfort and shelter. I learned a lot about incorporating research in writing by reading House by Tracy Kidder. Brenda Miller’s Season of the Body helped me understand structure and the way point of view can alter the entire power and feel of a piece. Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks showed me a braided structure that is both about the subject and the writer herself.  One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez gave me permission to use the fantastical – the huge imaginary – in my work.  And so many more.

4) What is your favorite genre to read or write? What inspires you?

I absolutely adore the essay – the personal essay, the memoir essay, the meandering essay, the avant garde essay – any essay, even academic ones sometimes.  I love to read them and write them.  They just remind me how versatile both language and the human experience are. LOVE!

When I’m just zoning out though, I usually choose young adult novels with some sort of supernatural bent.  Magic always makes a day better.

5) In your book, God’s Whisper Manifesto you write about your dream about owning a farm, when did you initially get the vision?

About ten years ago, I started hearing a lot of my friends – many of whom were doing work with disadvantaged populations or in developing countries – telling me how tired they were, how much they just needed a break, and I got this idea to have my home be a place where people could come and find respite.

As I thought about that dream, I began to read a lot about local foods and sustainability – people like Barbara Kingsolver and Jenna Woginrich. And as I thought about these things, I began to develop a dream for a farm, where we grew our own food, supported local farmers, and also provided people – artists in particular – a place to come and rest.  Hence, the dream – and now the reality – of God’s Whisper Farm.

6) Besides owning a beautiful farm, writing on your blog, you also have another book coming out, You Will Not Be Forgotten. How did the idea for writing this book come about?

I grew up on what used to be a slave plantation here in Virginia – my dad was the manager there.  All the time I lived there in high school, I never really thought about the people who built that place, the slaves. Sometime in college, I realized that some of the people I had gone to high school with were probably descended from those enslaved people, and I began thinking, wanting to know more about the individuals who had lived there and built the massive plantation houses on the property. So, that’s where the book began.

7) You also teach online classes, coach and edit manuscripts, besides crocheting the most adorable things. Could you tell me a little bit more about this?

Well, I was a college professor for over ten years. I taught creative writing and composition and literature. But I decided to step out of that to focus more on my writing, but I still love to teach, and I love to work with writers of any experience level. So I started Andilit – my business of online classes and manuscript editing. I’ve been making living for over a year now just doing that, and it’s wonderful.

8) I read you have earned a Bachelor’s Degree and two Master’s degree. You were also a professor in many universities across the United States. Did you always want to be a professor? What was the pivotal moment you decided you wanted to be a writer full time?

Yep, I’d always wanted to teach literature . . . right up until that day when Ted Gup suggested an alternative.  Then, I refocused and moved toward wanting to teach writing, which is what I focused on for part of my MFA.  But then, my mom got sick and died from cancer, and that put a lot of things in perspective for me. I didn’t want to spend my time in meetings or doing administrative tasks for colleges who did not appreciate my teaching or writing in any serious way. I wanted to write and work with other writers.  Hence, my own business.

9) What does your average day look like and what is your writing process and routine?

My day begins when my husband’s alarm clock goes off. He rolls over and snoozes; I get up and get the coffee on. I do some morning chores and have breakfast with him, and then I hit the computer.

I try to blog early in the day and then spend some time connecting with folks on Facebook or Twitter or via email.

Lately, I’ve been moving from that into my client’s work – editing manuscript, working with students, etc.

Usually, I take some time in the mid-day to read a bit, and then I’m back editing or reading student work.

Toward the end of the day, I turn to my own work and do my very best to get 1,000 words a day in every day.It used to be that I always wanted to get my own work in first, and there is something to be said for being free of other voices when you go to the page. But lately, I’ve found it very wonderful to look forward to my work-in-progress all day.

Plus, I like to close my day with creativity. It’s a wonderful way to be tired.

10) Lastly, what advice would you give to an aspiring writer?

Write.  That’s it. Write and read. Don’t worry about figuring out your niche or building a platform. If you want to write – if you want to write for the art itself, I should say – then just write.

Practice, practice, practice.  There’s so much to life as an artist that can’t be measured with money or rankings. Focus on the art, and you will never be disappointed.

Thank you, Andi.

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Andi Cumbo-Floyd is a writer, editor, and writing teacher who lives and works from her own little 10 acres in the mountains of Virginia – God’s Whisper Farm. She is happily married with a hound dog named Meander and three cats – Oscar, Emily, and Charlotte. With the help of her husband and dad, they are building a little place there for writers and artists to come and respite and sanctuary.

She is a creative nonfiction writer who is in the stages if self-publishing her book entitled You Will Not Be Forgotten, which tells the story of the people who were enslaved on the plantation where I was raised and of my process of getting to know them.

You can visit her blog at www.andilit.com.

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When He Plans The Next Step…

I’d like to introduce Heidi Kreider. She is a dear friend and my first guest to post on my new blog. I am so grateful to God to have crossed paths with her on the Michael Hyatt Platform Team and become friends. She is a gifted writer and godly woman. She authored a wonderful book called The Secret of Counting Gifts which she will be talking more about below.

Abruptly my life course changed direction. Though it wasn’t an earth shattering change, I felt like I had lost my purpose. For a decade I homeschooled. I thought I would graduate all three of my children. Instead, our home school whittled down to one. I wasn’t sure what to do with myself. My life didn’t look like the picture I carried around in my head.

A wise one once said, “the years reveal what the days cannot see.” In my insecurity, God was already at work. He had the next step of my life planned. He brought to fruition a life long dream of mine, to be an author. There was never enough time in a day to pursue any serious writing… until my life course changed direction. My God works that way, often in ways that I only recognize in hindsight.

I am now an author. More importantly, I am a Jesus lover, wife of 18 years, and mom to 3. I’ve spent the past fifteen years at home. My days are full taxing my children to their various events, adventuring on field trips, and laughing uproariously with my friends. I count gifts daily and seek grace and forgiveness hourly. I have been blessed with deep friendships and have prayed many friends through the horrific battle of breast cancer.

While homeschooling just one, I wrote my first novel, The Secret of Counting Gifts and the accompanying  journal The Secret of Counting Gifts Gratitude Journal. Both are now available in eBook and paperback through Amazon.com.

The Secret of Counting Gifts is a story about life, friendship, hardship, and gratitude. It is the story of Kris McClintock and Liz Bower and their friendship that spans twenty-eight years.

Through marriage, babies, and infidelity they stand by each other and hold one another up… until breast cancer delivers the final blow. As she sits by Liz, Kris recounts the trials and blessings that made them who they are. She tells their story and recalls the many “gifts” they have been blessed with throughout the years. She shares of how Liz taught her to notice the gifts in each day and to live with a grateful heart. It is through the telling of their story that the secret of counting gifts is discovered….

I look forward to seeing how God will use this next step in my life. Throughout this month, I am on a virtual book tour. You can see the stops along the way at www.heidikreider.com.

Come on over and say “Hey!” and register for my giveaway… autographed copies of  The Secret of Counting Gifts and The Secret of Counting Gifts Gratitude Journal in a hand-made basket.

I’d love to chat. How has your life direction changed? What is your next step?

**Heidi Kreider is a wife, mother, author, and friend. She blogs about life, grace, and gratitude at www.heidikreider.com.

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Wrecked by Jeff Goins

I barely made it out of bed alive this morning. Ok, maybe I’m exaggerating a little bit. But seriously, I am dead tired and it’s all Jeff Goins fault.

It’s his fault because I couldn’t stop reading his new book last night. I literally had to peel myself away and get some sleep.

Thus, I rolled out of bed, as we say in New York City, mad tired.

I began my daily routine by turning on the water to take a shower. Guess what, there was no hot water… again.

Needless to say, this isn’t what I would call an ideal way to start your day. However, the cold shower definitely jolted me awake. Seriously, you should try it some time.

While taking my cold shower, I was thinking of Wrecked. My thoughts brought me back to a time where a group of us from Times Square Church went on a short missions trip to Guatemala.

I remember when we first arrived to the mission, it was hot. We all wanted and needed to take a shower.  But, there was one little problem, there were no bathrooms or showers.

Thankfully, it began to rain.  We knew this was our opportunity to take a shower.

Now keep in mind, I’m from New York City, ok? I’ve only camped out maybe a few times in my life and poorly at that. I’ve never taken a shower in the middle of nowhere before, much less in the rain.

But there I was in the mountains of Guatemala, in the rain, with a bunch of people I didn’t know and a major decision to make. Shower or no shower, is the question. I felt gross, so I decided on the shower. The next dilemma was to figure out how and where?

The shower situation definitely took me out of my comfort zone. I basically was forced to use my imagination and pray… a lot.

Thankfully, the Lord had mercy on my poor soul and answered quickly. There, hidden in view, was my salvation… a small cascade of water falling off a tin roof. When the water hit my skin, it was as cold as my shower this morning.

The only difference is, I actually enjoyed it.

This experience definitely wrecked me and so is reading this book.

Wrecked is stirring me in a major way. Jeff Goins is a prolific and amazing writer. His writing is like eating your favorite ice cream, you don’t want to stop.

But whatever you do, don’t buy the book yet.  You don’t want to miss out on this:  http://wreckedthebook.com/.

Jeff Goins is a part-time blogger, speaker and author. He works full-time for a nonprofit organization called Adventures in Missions, where he serves as the Communications Director. In his free time, he writes books and shares ideas worth spreading.

Originally from the suburbs of Chicago, Jeff graduated from Illinois College with a double major in Spanish and Religion. There, he spent a semester in Spain, which opened his eyes to different cultures and stretched his worldview.
After a year of travel and long-distance communication, he moved to Tennessee to chase the woman who became his wife. In 2008, he married her.

Since 2006, Jeff has worked out of his home, overseeing marketing, communications, and innovation teams from afar. He is passionate about not only telling great stories, but living them, as well.

His blog, GoinsWriter.com, is one of the fastest-growing blogs on the web and is a well-respected resource for bloggers and writers. In 2011, it won the Top 10 Blogs for Writers award on WritetoDone.com. Each month, he receives over 80,000 visitors to his website.

Jeff’s work has been published online and offline in a variety of publications, including RELEVANT Magazine (which has a circulation of more than 150,000 readers), Copyblogger.com (voted by Ad Age as one of the top marketing blogs online), and ZenHabits.net (one of Time Magazine’s Top 50 Websites for threes years in a row).

Jeff and his wife, Ashley, live just outside of Nashville, TN with their son and dog.

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Book Review: You Are a Writer

You Are a Writer

By Jeff Goins
Print Length: 77 pages
Publisher: Jeff Goins
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services
Published: 1st Edition April 27, 2012
Language: English
ASIN: B007YJEIAS
Price: $4.99 (Kindle)
Purchase: Amazon

Description

You Are a Writer is a book about what it takes to be a writer in the 21st Century.

Author Jeff Goins shares his own story of self-doubt and what it took for him to become a professional. He gives you practical tips for freelancing, how to get published in magazines, and what it takes to build a platform that brings the gatekeepers to you.

This journey of becoming a writer begins with a simple but important belief: You are a writer; you just need to write. Readers will learn the importance of passion and discipline and how to show up every day to do the work.

Here’s what else you will learn:

  • How to stop waiting to be picked and finally choose yourself
  • What it takes to build a platform
  • Why authors need to brand themselves (and how to do it)
  • Tips for freelancing, guest blogging, and getting published in magazines
  • Different ways to network with other writers, artists, and influencers
  • The importance of blogging and social media and how to use it well to get more readers and fans of your writing

You Are a Writer is a book that will help you fall back in love with writing and make the connections you need to build your brand as a writer. It’s about living the dream of a life dedicated to words.

And it all begins with you.

Review

I have had the pleasure of following Jeff Goins’ blog for over several months now.  I was first introduced to his writing through friends on Twitter.  I was completely blown away.  I’m not exaggerating when I tell you that I love every single thing this man writes.

Jeff Goins is an incredibly gifted writer and communicator. He creates what Michael Hyatt calls in his book Platform, a “Wow” experience. Everything Jeff Goins does and writes is remarkable. I have learned so much from him by following his blog and participating in his writing challenges.

One of the things I love most about Jeff Goins is his heart.  He is kind, generous and a servant, which makes him such a great leader.  I am blessed to be a part of his tribe.

You Are a Writer is a brilliant book.  I started to read it and couldn’t put it down. This book goes step by step on how to make “You Are a Writer” a reality in your life. The first step is by confessing, believing, accepting and then acting upon it.

The way I did it was by first looking at myself in the mirror and saying to my reflection, “You Are a Writer”.  I confess I had to say it more than once to let it sink in.  It’s incredible how much resistance I faced with while doing this simple exercise.  Those unrelenting negative voices kept trying to convince me otherwise.

After I did this, I took it a step further by confessing it to the world on Facebook, Twitter and my co-workers.  I was surprised and happy to get a lot positive responses, which was encouraging.

If you ever dreamed of being a writer or if you are one and not really pursuing it, I highly recommend this book.  You Are a Writer will definitely help, inform, inspire and encourage you!

Author

Jeff Goins is a part-time blogger, speaker and author. He works full-time for a nonprofit organization called Adventures in Missions, where he serves as the Communications Director. In his free time, he writes books and shares ideas worth spreading.

Originally from the suburbs of Chicago, Jeff graduated from Illinois College with a double major in Spanish and Religion. There, he spent a semester in Spain, which opened his eyes to different cultures and stretched his worldview.

After a year of travel and long-distance communication, he moved to Tennessee to chase the woman who became his wife. In 2008, he married her.

Since 2006, Jeff has worked out of his home, overseeing marketing, communications, and innovation teams from afar. He is passionate about not only telling great stories, but living them, as well.

His blog, GoinsWriter.com, is one of the fastest-growing blogs on the web and is a well-respected resource for bloggers and writers. In 2011, it won the Top 10 Blogs for Writers award on WritetoDone.com. Each month, he receives over 80,000 visitors to his website.

Jeff’s work has been published online and offline in a variety of publications, including RELEVANT Magazine (which has a circulation of more than 150,000 readers), Copyblogger.com (voted by Ad Age as one of the top marketing blogs online), and ZenHabits.net (one of Time Magazine’s Top 50 Websites for threes years in a row).

Jeff and his wife, Ashley, live just outside of Nashville, TN with their son and dog.

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